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If you go back early this year during black history month I shared a post about my reflections as an African-American Woman in STEM #AAWiSTEM. I know that there many women in STEM that read my blog and can relate to some of the things I spoke about in this post.

The other day I was talking to one of my colleagues about why I decided to become a scientist and I talked about empowering women. I like to support organizations that promote women empowerment, especially women in STEM. When I started my blog I shared my 5 Tips for Women in Science and a month ago I wrote a science reflection post about the #LikeAGirl Campaign by Always. These posts make me think about this question further?:

How can we empower women in STEM? What do you think? Let’s start a discussion in the comment section.

Here is how we can get started:

Empowering Women in STEM:

1. Support Each Other:
As a woman in science I know that one of the biggest things that helped me to stay in science is my support system. My support system includes: my faith, God, family and other women in STEM. I like when I see women in STEM do amazing things and I like to see girls get excited about STEM! If we want to increase the number of women in STEM we have to build a strong support system and start now!

2. Mentor:
Along with support comes mentoring. I am working on some mentoring posts for the future (stay tuned). Mentoring is a big part of empowering women in STEM. When I realized I wanted to become a scientist I did not have many science role models. The only role model I had when I was younger was my aunt, who is an electrical engineer. She was my biggest influence and is one of the reasons I am scientist today. Who was your mentor at a young age?

3. Influence the Younger Generations:
It is important that we work with the younger generations. Like the Whitney Houston song says, “I believe the [girls] children are the future… [for STEM] teach them well and let them lead the way”. If we want to see higher numbers of women in STEM we have to start influencing girls at an early age. Programs like the National Society of Black Engineers Summer Engineering Experience for Kids (NSBE SEEK) and Black Girls Code are amazing for influencing.

4. Spread the Word:
Tell everyone you know about STEM. STEM is so big and you pretty much can do anything with a STEM degree. Use your social media accounts to spread the word. If we don’t who will?

5. Continue to be Successful in Your STEM Career:
When you win, we all win. A win for one woman in STEM is a win for all of us. Search Mademoiselle Scientist Spotlight to learn more information about women in STEM. These are all great female scientists that have paved the way. The more successful women girls see the more likely they will want to become a successful mademoiselle scientist.

How will you empower women in STEM? Share below.

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