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Last week I was reading Biochem Belle’s blog post, Changing Course, Part 3: Open exploration. This post was a continuation post and she shared how the myIDP tool helped her figure what she wanted to do next in her career. After spending time on the myIDP tool she discovered, MySciCareer.com. Since I never heard MySciCareer I had to explore and decided this would be a be a great double Feature Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist post. After all I enjoy finding new resources for scientists. Thank you, Biochem Belle for sharing this resource and I look forward to reading more about your changing course series!

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer:

MySciCareer was founded by two Mademoiselle Scientists that are biochemists, Eva Amsen and Lou Woodley. Eva is the Outreach Director at F1000 Research and Lou is currently a freelance community engagement specialist. Another cool thing about these Mademoiselle Scientists is that they are both bloggers and are big on science outreach. They both have lots of writing and blogging up their sleeve. Eva launched and ran the developmental biology blog, the Node, shares her musician side on her blog, MusiSci, and blogs on easternblog.net and The Finch and Pea. Lou founded and served as Managing Editor of BlueSci Magazine, If you want to see more of her, check out her blog, Social in Silico, where she integrates people, science and technology.

It’s great to see fellow Mademoiselle Scientists that are bloggers and collaborating. When I started Mademoiselle Scientist I only knew about a handful of women in STEM bloggers, now every day my list is growing! If you know any blogs I should check out link them below in the comments section. I’m glad these Mademoiselle Scientists decided to come together to create MySciCareer

What is MySciCareer?

According to MySciCareer.com it is a website where you can come to get first-person career stories. This is a great way to see how other scientists feel about their career and get a glimpse of what to expect. On the homepage you will see quotes scrolling across the screen. When you see a quote you like you can click on it to read more about the person who was quoted to learn more about their science story. Or if you are looking for a specific field or industry you can search on the archives page.

Sometimes it can become overwhelming to find a career match because there are many options with a STEM degree. This is why MySciCareer is helpful. I enjoy hearing what fellow STEM-ers are doing in their career.
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After spending time reading the stories I recommend MySciCareers to my readers and anyone in the STEM field. I believe it is important to share your STEM experience with others because we should all help each other. Looking for more? Check out my Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist Double Feature post on Dr. Amy Freeman.

Have you checked out MySciCareer.com or Biochem Belle? If not, check it out! What other science resources do you recommend? Share below.

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