Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope Podcast:

It’s been a long time since I have shared a Spotlight on Science or Mademoiselle Scientist post and I have to say I missed writing these posts. I haven’t listened to a science podcast in some time because I took a small break from podcasts. Not that long ago I was looking for a new science podcast and came across Beyond the (Micro)scope. Beyond the (Micro)scope is a podcast focusing on science, technology and business topics of women in science. I’m a huge advocate for women in STEM so this podcast was up my alley.

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope:

Beyond the (Micro)Scope was founded by Lindsay Claiborn and Dr. Mumu Xu. Claiborn is a multimedia journalist with a background in television reporting and digital producer at FOX Soccer. She is a Claremont McKenna College alum and has a Master’s in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University. Xu is an assistant professor in aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park and her research focuses on designing and controlling unmanned systems. She has a M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology and her B.S. from Harvard University.

It’s great seeing women coming together with a passion for STEM. I’m always looking for new science podcasts and/or blogs to check out to learn more about research news, science outreach and different STEM-ers doing great things. If you have any suggestions leave a link in the comments section.

What is Beyond the (Micro)Scope?:

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Photo Credit: Beyond the Microscope

Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope Podcast:

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Science Mentor/Donna Kridelbaugh

In my last Mademoiselle Spotlight I talked about The Thesis Whisperer and for this post I wanted to feature Donna Kridelbaugh/Science Mentor as this month’s Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist. Donna has amazing content for early career researchers and professionals. I’m happy to share information about Science Mentor because I enjoy finding resources for STEM-ers.

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Photo Credit: ScienceMentor

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh:

When I started blogging I only had a handful of followers and I did not know about the science blogging community. I just knew that I wanted to share my journey with others. After a few months of blogging I received an email from Science Mentor and she told me how she liked my blog. This was exciting because I just started blogging. So I checked out her blog and it is indeed a gem of resources.

I enjoyed talking to her about my journey and moving forward in the science communication community. We have some overlapping interests and it’s good to talk to someone who understands the science journey. She gave me some great advice and I know it will help my readers out too. Even though I’m new to blogging and shy I’m going to work on putting myself out there because I want to help other STEM-ers. Thank you Donna for helping me and inspiring me to continue to share my journey through blogging.

Who is Science Mentor?: Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Science Mentor/Donna Kridelbaugh

Mademoiselle Spotlight Feature: The Thesis Whisperer/Dr. Inger Mewburn

As a graduate student I unofficially started blogging (generating ideas and topics) and discovered my first higher education blog, The Thesis Whisperer.

Dr Inger Mewburn The Thesis Whisperer

Photo Credit: TheThesisWhisperer 

Mademoiselle Spotlight: The Thesis Whisperer/Dr. Inger Mewburn:

Before officially starting Mademoiselle Scientist I reached out to The Thesis Whisperer. She gave me some great feedback and tips to get started with my blog. The advice I remember the most is to just start blogging. There are not many blogs in the early academic, science, women in STEM, student and early research career category so there is a huge need. So I started blogging and here I am two years into blogging. I have a lot to learn and many things to share in my journey as a woman in science.

Looking back I’m glad I took The Thesis Whisperer’s advice because I really enjoy reading her blog. I highly recommend it! It is a gem of resources for graduate students and professionals. I can’t believe I didn’t know about The Thesis Whisperer earlier in my academic career. It would have been handy. On the bright side, I’m glad I found it.

What is The Thesis Whisperer? Continue reading Mademoiselle Spotlight Feature: The Thesis Whisperer/Dr. Inger Mewburn

Mademoiselle Scientist/Spotlight on Science: Dr. Monica Cox

In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) I want to do a double feature to spotlight Dr. Monica Cox as this month’s Mademoiselle Scientist and Spotlight on Science. If you want to check out my last double feature check out my feature about MySciCareer and Dr. Amy Freeman to learn more about women that are doing great things in science!

A couple of weeks ago I was on twitter and I came across Dr. Monica F. Cox after participating in a #BLACKandSTEM twitter chat. I like to keep my Mademoiselle Scientists network growing because it helps me build a strong support system. In an earlier post I talked about the importance of professional mentors and how I didn’t have many women STEM mentors growing up. I’m glad to see that I’m finding mentors everywhere! Continue reading Mademoiselle Scientist/Spotlight on Science: Dr. Monica Cox

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer

Last week I was reading Biochem Belle’s blog post, Changing Course, Part 3: Open exploration. This post was a continuation post and she shared how the myIDP tool helped her figure what she wanted to do next in her career. After spending time on the myIDP tool she discovered, MySciCareer.com. Since I never heard MySciCareer I had to explore and decided this would be a be a great double Feature Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist post. Thank you, Biochem Belle for sharing this resource and I look forward to reading more about your changing course series!

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer:

MySciCareer was founded by two Mademoiselle Scientists that are biochemists, Eva Amsen and Lou Woodley. Eva is the Outreach Director at F1000 Research and Lou is currently a freelance community engagement specialist. Another cool thing about these Mademoiselle Scientists is that they are both bloggers and are big on science outreach. They both have lots of writing and blogging up their sleeve. Eva launched and ran the developmental biology blog, the Node, shares her musician side on her blog, MusiSci, and blogs on easternblog.net and The Finch and Pea. Lou founded and served as Managing Editor of BlueSci Magazine, If you want to see more of her, check out her blog, Social in Silico, where she integrates people, science and technology.

It’s great to see fellow Mademoiselle Scientists that are bloggers and collaborating. When I started Mademoiselle Scientist I only knew about a handful of women in STEM bloggers, now every day my list is growing! If you know any blogs I should check out link them below in the comments section. I’m glad these Mademoiselle Scientists decided to come together to create MySciCareer Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Dr. Amy Freeman:

In my last Spotlight on Science post I talked about Dr. Greg Martin. For this Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist post I will like to spotlight Dr. Amy Freeman.

Dr Amy Freeman

Photo Credit: AmyFreeman.net

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Dr. Amy Freeman:

Dr. Freeman is a writer, speaker, educator and Assistant Dean of Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Management from Washington State University, and both a Master of Science degree in Architectural Engineering and Ph.D. in Workforce Education from the Pennsylvania State University. In addition, she belongs to numerous organizations including the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) to name a few. She is a perfect example of a great role model for women in STEM.

The first time I met Dr. Freeman was at my first college fair. She told me about the opportunities at Penn State for students interested in STEM: Pre-First Year Science and Engineering Program and the Women in Engineering Program Orientation. A few years later I participated and both of those programs and they helped shaped me into who I am today. She is also one of the reasons I’m passionate about helping the next generations of scientists. When you meet Dr. Freeman you can see the passion in her heart when it comes to STEM diversity. She oversees many diversity programs such as the Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP) and Women in Engineering Program (WEP) among other things. Not to mention she is a dynamic speaker. If you want to sample a bit of her energy check out her YouTube Channel.  Do you feel her energy?

Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Dr. Amy Freeman:

Mademoiselle Scientist September Birthday Spotlight: Irène Joliot-Curie

September is my favorite month and this month I have many things to celebrate. In my last post I talked about how September 2nd marked my 1st Blogiversary for Mademoiselle Scientist. Next week I am starting a new series, Spotlight on Science. Since Irène Joliot-Curie and I share the same birthday (September 12) it makes sense to pick her as my Mademoiselle Scientist September Birthday Spotlight. If you want to check out my other Mademoiselle Scientist Spotlights check out my blog posts about: Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Dr. Jewel Plummer Cobb and Dr. Mae Jemison. These are all amazing Mademoiselle Scientists.

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Photo Source:

Irène Joliot-Curie was born on September 12, 1897 in Paris, France. She was the daughter of Marie and Pierre, two physicists that shared half of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903 with Antoine Henri Becquerel. Following her parents footsteps she also excelled at science and mathematics. She even worked with her mother, Marie Curie at the Radium Institute in Paris. Like her mother, she was committed to science, excellence, research, and discovery.

Irène continued to excel and studied at the Radium Institute in Paris where her doctoral thesis focused on alpha rays of polonium. In 1925 after years of research she received her Doctorate of Science. While she was working at the Radium Institute she met a physicist named, Frédéric Joliot and a year later they were married. A few years later she was appointed as lecturer in 1932, and in 1935 their research paid off. They won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their recognition of their synthesis of new radioactive elements. After winning the Nobel Prize in 1937 Irène became a professor and later Director of the Radium Institute in 1946. To learn more about their Nobel Prize Award and others check out NobelPrize.org.

Their discovery led to further studies and tools to help with cancer treatment. After many years working with very hazardous materials Irène was diagnosed with leukemia due to exposure of polonium. Later her health began to decline and she died on March 17, 1956 of leukemia at the age of 58 after a lifetime of exposure to radiation.

Continue reading Mademoiselle Scientist September Birthday Spotlight: Irène Joliot-Curie