A Bit More About Mademoiselle Scientist + The Importance of Having a Science Community

This month I celebrated my 4th Blog Anniversary and I decided it was a great time for me to share a bit more me and why I started Mademoiselle Scientist . My name is Martina and I am a toxicologist, science communicator, and STEM education advocate. I started Mademoiselle Scientist as a way to share my journey as a woman in STEM and support the next generation of scientists. I am passionate about all things STEM: research, mentoring, education and outreach. I want to help scientists succeed, students excel and share information that I have learned along my journey. I see myself as a mentor sharing advice I wish I would have known when I was getting started in STEM.

Early in my journey, there were not many resources like we have today. I remember taking a Minorities in STEM Freshman Seminar Class at Penn State and that was the first time I saw a large group of students who looked like me that were aspiring scientists and engineers. A few years later I found myself surrounded by even more scientists and engineers at the National Society of Black Engineers National Convention. Now I am seeing an increasing number of scientists and engineers who are in leadership roles in higher education, science policy, research and science communication that as a freshman I did not see.

It is incredible to see science, education and research change, but it is also amazing that I have this platform. When I started my Mademoiselle Scientist I did not think that my experiences, the information I learned along the way and resources would turn into a science community. I just wanted a way to help scientists, especially college and underrepresented students learn that they too can become scientists and engineers.

Every day the science community is growing. When I started Mademoiselle Scientist there were only a few blogs out there. Out of the few blogs, I read there were not many blogs that shared information to help scientists, college students and those thinking about graduate school. Also, I did not see many blogs run by minorities or women in STEM. Today there is a platform for everyone.

A Few of My Favorite Blogs in the Science Community: Continue reading A Bit More About Mademoiselle Scientist + The Importance of Having a Science Community

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh

In my last Mademoiselle Spotlight, I wrote about The Thesis Whisperer, and for this post, I am featuring Donna Kridelbaugh as this month’s Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist. Donna has amazing content for early career researchers and professionalskridelbaugh

Photo Credit: Donna Kridelbaugh

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh:

When I started Mademoiselle Scientist I only had a handful of followers and I did not know about the online science community. I just knew I wanted to share. Donna was one of my first followers who left a comment and were able to set up a time to chat. She shared her STEM journey and her work with her Science Mentor. I talked about my STEM journey and what I’m doing with Mademoiselle Scientist. We have some overlapping interests and it was nice talking to someone who understands the STEM journey. She gave me some great advice and I know it will help my readers out too. Even though I’m new to this platform, I’m excited about what is next. Thank you Donna for helping and inspiring me to continue to write on this platform.

What is Science Mentor?: Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh

My 2nd Blogiversary: My STEM Journey – To be Continued…

Welcome to my 2nd Blogiversary of Mademoiselle Scientist. After two years of blogging here is what I learned:

STEM interests generally start early: I have always been excited about all things STEM. At a very young age I knew that I wanted to become a scientist and later get my Ph.D. (This is something I’m still exploring if the right opportunity/program/time comes.) But the one thing I questioned was; how would I get there? I know we all have been there at one point of our STEM career.

Resources need to be accessible to all. There are many budding students who have this same question but some will never become scientists due to lack of resources. With the right exposure, opportunity and mentors students will have the tools needed to become scientists. I am excited to see what the next generation of scientists brings.

Mentoring is important at all levels. Mentors are people who went through though the ups and downs of a STEM career and want to pay it forward. It’s not impossible without mentors but mentors can make a huge difference. My mentors from an early age helped me to become a scientist, researcher, STEM advocate and science communicator. Through all the challenges I still wanted to pursue a STEM career because I cannot imagine myself doing something outside of  STEM.

Science communication is a great tool, especially when combined with education. Further into my STEM journey I discovered my passion for STEM goes beyond research and writing. My passion extends to being an STEM educational advocate for underrepresented groups. My goal is to share resources to support the next generations of scientists. As a science communicator I hope to grow Mademoiselle Scientist into a platform that will be accessible to all who are interested in STEM careers.

Continue reading My 2nd Blogiversary: My STEM Journey – To be Continued…

The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat Reflection:

After participating in The Real Talk about the Ph.D. #PioneerChat hosted by Dr. Monica F. Cox with guest host, Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro I have some reflections. Since I am prospective Ph.D. student I was looking forward to this discussion because I enjoy hearing people talk about their Ph.D. journeys.

To find out more about #PioneerChat, Dr. Monica Cox and Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro click here. Continue reading The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat Reflection:

Spring Cleaning: 5 Quick Tips to Declutter Your Inbox

Inboxes can get easily get out of hand. Let’s fix that. Here are 5 tips to get you started:

5 Quick Tips to Declutter Your Inbox:

1. Unsubscribe from unnecessary notifications:
This is one of the biggest ways to decrease your daily emails. Unsubscribe from news feeds, social media notifications and any other subscription services that you do not need. For example, if you read a lot of blogs sign up for Bloglovin’, which is a website that allows you to read all of your blogs in one place instead of reading the blog post in your inbox or going to the blogger’s site.

2. Color Code, Create Labels and Filters:
I’m big on organizing, especially color coding. Gmail has great color coding and labeling options to keep your emails organized. If you don’t have a Gmail account many email accounts have color coding options, which will make checking your email a breeze. Use the filters and labels to your advantage.

3. Daily Maintenance:
When you check your email immediately delete the emails you do not need.

4. Respond as Soon as You Can:
The longer you wait to respond the more emails pile up. If an email takes more time to respond to set a reminder and use the stars feature to set it as a priority to email back.

5. Set a Time to Check Your Email:
Decide what time is good for you and set a small block of time dedicated to checking your email. When you do this you will find yourself spending less time looking through your inbox.

What tips do you have for getting your inbox under control? Share below.

Spotlight on Science: This Week in Science (#TWIS)

In my last Spotlight on Science Post I talked about MySciCareer as a resource for scientists. Now, I’m back for another resource for scientists. The only podcasts I follow are This Week in Virology (TWIV) and This Week in Global Health (TWiGH). So when I heard about This Week in Science (TWIS) on Twitter I had to check it out. I love learning about anything related to STEM. The great thing about TWIS is that they talk about various topics in science and each episode is a chance to find out the latest things happening in science and technology. Continue reading Spotlight on Science: This Week in Science (#TWIS)

What Does a Scientist Look Like?/Too Pretty to be a Scientist

A few months ago the Science Mentor told me about a new science blogger, La Cientifica. So I went on over to her blog and came across her post, Please Refrain. In this post she shared some of the crazy comments she gets as a woman in science. Here are some of the comments that stood out to me the most:

  • Come on angels.
  • Women live longer than men because they don’t work as hard.
  • The only intelligent woman I know is my wife.
  • You don’t dress like a scientist.
  • Do you plan on having a baby anytime soon?

I can say that I have heard these before. Have you? These comments are inappropriate,  disrespectful, and unprofessional. I remember reading a few articles about this topic and the Women in Astronomy (Is Science in the Eye of the Beholder?) and it does not make sense how common these questions get asked.

When did society make it okay for people to make rude comments to women in STEM? This is unacceptable and has to stop. As a Mademoiselle Scientist I should only be judged by the work that I do, not what I look like. Since I look young and dress stylishly I often get the comments like: “you look so young”, or “real scientists don’t care about how they look, this is not a fashion show” and sometimes I don’t get taken seriously. The last time I checked there is nothing wrong with being feminine or taking pride in my appearance.

Have you ever heard, “you don’t look like a scientist”? Or how about, “You are too pretty to be a scientist”? If so, this has to spot. Let’s come together change the narrative and make a chances so our voices will be heard that we are scientists. Continue reading What Does a Scientist Look Like?/Too Pretty to be a Scientist

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer

Last week I was reading Biochem Belle’s blog post, Changing Course, Part 3: Open exploration. This post was a continuation post and she shared how the myIDP tool helped her figure what she wanted to do next in her career. After spending time on the myIDP tool she discovered, MySciCareer.com. Since I never heard MySciCareer I had to explore and decided this would be a be a great double Feature Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist post.

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer:

MySciCareer was founded by two Mademoiselle Scientists that are biochemists, Eva Amsen and Lou Woodley. Eva is the Outreach Director at F1000 Research and Lou is currently a community engagement specialist. Another cool thing about these Mademoiselle Scientists is that they are both bloggers and are big on science outreach. They both have lots of writing and blogging up their sleeve. Eva launched and ran the developmental biology blog, the Node, shares her musician side on her blog, MusiSci, and blogs on easternblog.net and The Finch and Pea. Lou founded and served as Managing Editor of BlueSci Magazine, If you want to see more of her, check out her blog, Social in Silico, where she integrates people, science and technology.

It’s great to see fellow Mademoiselle Scientists that are bloggers and collaborating. When I started Mademoiselle Scientist I only knew about a handful of women in STEM bloggers, now every day my list is growing. I’m glad these Mademoiselle Scientists decided to come together to create MySciCareer Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer

Being a #BLACKandSTEM Woman Twitter Chat Reflection

Every Thursday #BLACKandSTEM has Twitter chats on various topics. On Thursday, October 30, I participated in their discussion about being a Black Woman in STEM. In case you missed the Twitter chat click here to find out more information.

Let’s get started with my reflection: Continue reading Being a #BLACKandSTEM Woman Twitter Chat Reflection

Spotlight on Science: Global Health with Dr. Greg Martin #TWiGH

Dr-Greg-martin

Photo Credit: Dr. Greg Martin

Since I am a toxicologist who is interested in vaccine development I started taking courses on Coursera.org to learn more. In my first Spotlight on Science post I talked about Dr. Vincent Racaniello and how his two virology courses helped me learn more about virology and vaccines. Similarly, Dr. Greg Martin is a scientist who shares his knowledge to make science accessible to all on his YouTube Channel and Twitter. Dr. Martin is a medical doctor with an MPH and MBA, Editor in Chief of Globalization and Health, and has diverse experience in global health. He is the person to watch if you want to learn more about global health. Continue reading Spotlight on Science: Global Health with Dr. Greg Martin #TWiGH