My Reading List II

I’m excited about sharing this reading list because it is a mix of really good books. Plus, if you haven’t read the book Hidden Figures or see the movie you have to check it out.

My Reading List II:

  • Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly
  • Holding Fast to Dreams: Empowering Youth from the Civil Rights Crusade to STEM Achievement by Freeman Hrabowski III
  • Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science and the World by Rachel Swaby
  • Zika: The Emerging Epidemic by Donald G. McNeil
  • The Craft of Research by Wayne Booth

What books are you reading? Comment below.

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Professional Role Models in STEM

If you look at my blog post about why I started Mademoiselle Scientist you will know that one of my goals for Mademoiselle Scientist is to be a resource for women in STEM. Before I started Mademoiselle Scientist The Thesis Whisperer was the first science blog I came across and she inspired me to get started science blogging. After that I found more women in STEM bloggers that have inspired me: Science Mentor#BLACKandSTEM, and Ellekement to name a few. If you have any women in STEM bloggers I should check out share in the comments section.

As I move forward with Mademoiselle Scientist I want to share more of my experiences and blog posts that will help women in STEM. A few months ago I talked about some ways that we can empower women in STEM. I believe the easiest way to do this is by mentoring the future generations of Mademoiselle Scientists. Before I talk about mentoring (I will share in a future post) I want to talk about the importance of professional role models. Continue reading Professional Role Models in STEM

Empowering Women in STEM

If you go back early this year during black history month I shared a post about my reflections as Black Woman in STEM #AAWiSTEM. I know that there many women in STEM that read my blog and can relate to some of the things I spoke about in that post.

The other day I was talking to one of my colleagues about why I decided to become a scientist and I talked about empowering women. I like to support organizations that support minorities and women in STEM. When I started my blog I shared my 5 Tips for Women in Science and a month ago I wrote a science reflection post about the #LikeAGirl Campaign by Always. These posts make me think about this question further. How can we empower women in STEM? What do you think? Let’s start a discussion in the comment section.

Here is how we can get started:

Empowering Women in STEM: Continue reading Empowering Women in STEM

10 Gift Ideas for Science Graduates

It’s graduation season. (Cue Pomp and Circumstance) I have compiled a list of gifts that are both functional and unique so you can find the perfect gift for your science graduate. What gift is your favorite?

 

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10 Gift Ideas for Science Graduates:  Continue reading 10 Gift Ideas for Science Graduates

Women’s History Month Edition of Mademoiselle Scientist Spotlight: Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

In honor of Women History Month I decided to write a post to celebrate Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

Photo Credit: TheGuardian.com

Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi is a virologist, professor, and Director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Unit, Virology Department at Institut Pasteur in Paris, France. Dr. Barré-Sinoussi was born on July 30, 1947 in Paris, France. She was the only child and had a passion for science at an early age. When she entered undergraduate she decided to pursue a natural science degree because she wanted to make discoveries.

Shortly after she began to work in the laboratory with Jean-Claude Chermann at the Pasteur Institute studying retroviruses and cancer in mice and completed her Ph.D. there. In 1975 she was offered a fully funded research position supervised by Montagnier. Since I am interested vaccine and infectious disease research I wanted to showcase Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi’s cutting-edge contributions to science in the field of disease transmission, immunity, and virology.

In 2008 two of the greatest discoveries were honored. 2008 was the year the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared with three scientists. Harald zur Hausen has 1/2 of the Prize share “for his discovery of human papilloma virus causing cervical cancer”, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi has 1/4 of the Prize share and Luc Montagnier has 1/4 of the Prize share “for their discovery of human immunodeficiency5 virus”. As stated on Nobelprize.org website,”It was identified in lymphocytes from patients with enlarged lymph nodes in early stages of acquired immunodeficiency, and in the blood from patients with late stage disease” To learn more about the discovery check out the nobelprize.org.

Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi represents one of the 44 total women that have been awarded the Nobel Prize (1901-2013) and one of the 16 total women that have been awarded the Nobel Prize in the Sciences. She believes that receiving the Nobel Prize is also a prize for everyone in the community. Continue reading Women’s History Month Edition of Mademoiselle Scientist Spotlight: Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

Recharge and Refocus

Fall is a great time to recharge and refocus.

Here are my top tips:

Reevaluate your goals:

At the beginning of the year most of us make our New Year’s Resolutions. The fall season is a good time to check your progress. Did you achieve your goals? Do you need to redefine them? What are your next steps? There is still time to make some changes.

Re-network:

Hopefully you improved your networking game this year. If not, you still have time. Step outside of your comfort zone and meet new people. This should be pretty easy because there are many career fairs, new student orientation, and many networking events during the fall. Take advantage of this season to broaden your network.

Mentoring:

Everyone should have a mentor. Become a mentor, find new mentors or do both! Do you remember when you were starting college? Your first job? Here’s a quick story. When I started college I was very shy. I didn’t know anyone at my university. So I decided to join a group for women in STEM at Penn State. By joining this group I was able to meet other young women in STEM and build friendships. Also, I was able to find mentors. The fall is a great time to mentor a young scientist AND find a new mentor for yourself.

What are you doing to recharge and refocus? Comment below.