My Summer Reading List II

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Now that summer is coming to an end and many people are back from vacation I decided this was a good time for me to share what I’ve been reading this summer. I had so many books in mind and it was hard to narrow down. If you checked out my spring reading list you will notice I picked a lot of books about careers and this summer I picked up some more.

My Summer Reading List II: Continue reading

The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat Reflection:

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Since many people are graduating I thought it would be a good time to share some PhD reflections from a #PioneerChat. A few months ago I participated in: The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat hosted by Dr. Monica F. Cox with guest host, Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro. As a prospective PhD student I was looking forward to this twitter chat because I wanted to see what people who have been through the PhD process have to say. Plus it’s a great way to e-meet and network with fellow women in STEM.

To find out more about #PioneerChats, Dr. Monica Cox and Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro click here.

Just in case you missed the #PioneerChat click here to see it on storify.

Let’s get started!: Continue reading

#DearME STEM College Student Edition: What I Would Tell My Younger Self Part II

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A few months ago I was watching a beauty related video on YouTube and I came across this #DearME video. The #DearME Initiative is a global Initiative started by YouTube to celebrate International Women’s Day (March 8) to empower young girls everywhere. After watching a few #DearME videos I was inspired share my #DearME STEM College Student Edition. I believe it is important to reflect on the past to truly understand your journey. If you are a recent graduate or looking to update your myIDP tool write down the advice you would give your younger self. Think back to when you were a freshman in college. Here are the things I would tell my younger self – STEM College Student Edition:

#DearME: My Advice to My Younger Self – STEM College Student Edition:

1. It’s okay if you change your major: When you go to college you may have an idea about what major or career you want, but things can change. After taking a few courses you may want to explore different majors. Talk to your academic advisor and upperclassmen to see what other majors are out there. Remember your major doesn’t define you. Whether you want to become an engineer, scientist or work in public health there are many pathways to your career.

2. Don’t be afraid to be assertive: Ask questions, reach out to potential mentors and network. As a freshman this can be a bit scary, but give it a try. When you come out of your shell and start putting yourself out there people will notice. Plus you never know what opportunities you will find. If you are looking for some tips and tricks the book, Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office: 101 Unconscious Mistakes Women Make That Sabotage Their Careers by Lois Frankel is a good resource.

3. Explore the opportunities that STEM can take you early on: A STEM degree can take you anywhere. Sometimes thinking about different career paths can be a bit overwhelming as a STEM college student. Take time to talk to people and explore the opportunities at your university’s career center. Whether you want to study abroad, do research or get an internship seek opportunities. Even if you are a freshman you can start.

4. Remember your hard work will pay off: Being a STEM college student is a challenge, but all the obstacles you will face are worth it. Study-a-thons, hectic schedules and 4-hour chemistry labs may seem like a lot, but you will make it. Space out your course-load so that you can have a fun course in the mix of your STEM courses. The life of a STEM college student is about balance and you will learn it before you graduate. Remember success is great, but you don’t have to break yourself getting there. There will be ups and downs, but you will get through it.

5. Don’t be afraid to ask for help before it is too late: If you are having a difficult time in one of your STEM courses ask for help. Find a group of peers in your major. Groups like NSBE, SWE, SHPE and SOT are great places to start. Plus if you join these groups you can make new friends in your major and have a strong support system to help you through your college career.

6. Enjoy your college experience: Even though you may have a busy life as a STEM college student make sure you have fun. Go to social events, join groups or play sports. College is not only about getting your education, but it is also about having fun. When you graduate college you want to look back and say you were able to earn your degree and enjoy your college experience.

7. Don’t let negativity get you down: There will be people who believe that women or minorities in STEM cannot be successful. Don’t let their negativity get in your way of moving forward in your STEM career. Find a group of people who get you and can help you through your tough times.

To learn more check out part I of my advice to my younger STEM self.

What would you tell your younger self as a STEM College Student? #DearME

Share below.

My Spring Reading List II

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Now that spring is here its time to share my spring reading list. Since spring is a time to refresh yourself I decided to read books focusing on being successful. If you are feeling drained or unmotivated after this long winter, reading these types of books will help you get back on track. Here’s to getting motivated!

 
My Spring Reading List:

Continue reading

Mademoiselle Scientist/Spotlight on Science: Dr. Monica Cox

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In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) I want to do a double feature to spotlight Dr. Monica Cox as this month’s Mademoiselle Scientist and Spotlight on Science. If you want to check out my last double feature check out my feature about MySciCareer and Dr. Amy Freeman to learn more about women that are doing great things in science!

A couple of weeks ago I was on twitter and I came across Dr. Monica F. Cox after participating in a #BLACKandSTEM twitter chat. I clicked on her twitter profile and checked out some of her tweets and knew I had to follow her. I like to keep my Mademoiselle Scientists network growing because it helps me build a strong support system. In an earlier post I talked about the importance of professional mentors and how I didn’t have may women STEM mentors growing up. I’m glad to see that I’m finding mentors everywhere! Continue reading

Spring Cleaning: 5 Quick Tips to Declutter Your Inbox

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Spring is around the corner! You know what that means — spring cleaning. I know most of you can relate to getting tons of emails everyday. At times it can be overwhelming. In the spirit of spring I want to sharing my top 5 quick tips to declutter your inbox. If you are looking for more spring inspiration check out my blog post, Ways to Refresh Yourself for the New Season of Spring.

Let’s get started!

5 Quick Tips to Declutter Your Inbox: Continue reading

Spotlight on Science: This Week in Science (#TWIS)

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In my last spotlight on science I talked about MySciCareer as a resource for scientists. Now, I’m back for another resource for scientists. This time I’m going to share a podcast I have been listening to lately. As far as science podcast go I have only been subscribed to This Week in Virology (TWIV) and This Week in Global Health (TWiGH). Then a few months ago I was looking on twitter and I came across This Week in Science (TWIS) so I decided to check it out. I’m all for listening to talks about science. After listening to a few episodes I decided TWIS is something that I want to tune into on a regular basis. The cool thing about TWIS is that they talk about various topics in science and each episode is a chance to find out the latest things happening in science and technology. With that being said I recommend TWIS for anyone in the STEM field! I like listening to this podcast in the evening. Continue reading

What Does a Scientist Look Like?/Too Pretty to be a Scientist

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A few months ago Science Mentor told me about a new science blogger, La Cientifica. So I went on over to her blog and came across her post, Please Refrain. In this post she shares some of the crazy comments she gets as a woman in science. Here are some of the comments that stood out to me the most:

  • Come on angels.
  • Women live longer then men because they don’t work as hard.
  • The only intelligent woman I know is my wife.
  • You don’t dress like a scientist.
  • Do you plan on having a baby anytime soon?

I can say that I have heard these before. Have you? These comments are inappropriate and disrespectful! I remember reading a few posts about this topic and the Women in Astronomy (Is Science in the Eye of the Beholder?) blog post.

When did society make it okay for people to make rude comments to women in STEM? This is unacceptable and has to stop! As a mademoiselle scientist I should only be judged by the work that I do, not what I look like. Since I look young and dress stylish I often get the comments like: “you look so young”, or “look like you should be in a different career” and sometimes I don’t get taken seriously. It’s a shame that things are this way. The last time I checked there is nothing wrong with being feminine or taking pride in my appearance.

Have you ever heard, “you don’t look like a scientist”? Or how about, “you are too pretty to be a scientist”? I know some of you may have heard these things before. It’s time that we take a stand and make a change. We have to let our voices be heard. How can we change this? Continue reading

My Informational Interview Tips

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Before subscribing to Science Mentor’s blog I was not familiar with informational interviews. After having my share of informational interviews I have learned a few things along the way. Here are my tips for informational interviews:

Let’s get started! Continue reading

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer

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Last week I was reading Biochem Belle’s blog post, Changing Course, Part 3: Open exploration. This post was a continuation post and she shared how the myIDP tool helped her figure out where she wanted to go next in her career. After spending time on the myIDP tool she discovered, MySciCareer.com. Since I never heard MySciCareer I had to explore and decided this would be a be a great double Feature Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist post. After all I enjoy finding new resources for scientists. Thank you Biochem Belle for sharing this resource and I look forward to reading more about your changing course series!

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: MySciCareer:

MySciCareer was founded by two Mademoiselle Scientists that are biochemists, Eva Amsen and Lou Woodley. Eva is the Outreach Director at F1000 Research and Lou is currently a freelance community engagement specialist. Another cool thing about these Mademoiselle Scientists is that they are both bloggers and are big on science outreach. They both have lots of writing and blogging up their sleeve. Eva launched and ran the developmental biology blog, the Node, shares her musician side on her blog, MusiSci, and blogs on easternblog.net and The Finch and Pea. Lou founded and served as Managing Editor of BlueSci Magazine, If you want to see more of her, check out her blog, Social in Silico, where she integrates people, science and technology.

It’s great to see fellow Mademoiselle Scientists that are bloggers and collaborating. When I started Mademoiselle Scientist I only knew about a handful of women in STEM bloggers, now everyday my list is growing! If you know any blogs I should check out link them below in the comments section. I’m glad these Mademoiselle Scientists decided to come together to create MySciCareer Continue reading

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