Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Science Mentor/Donna Kridelbaugh


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In my last Mademoiselle Spotlight I talked about The Thesis Whisperer and for this post I wanted to feature Donna Kridelbaugh/Science Mentor as this month’s Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist. Donna has amazing content for early career researchers and professionals. I’m happy to share information about Science Mentor because I enjoy finding resources for STEM-ers.


Photo Credit: ScienceMentor

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh:

When I started blogging I only had a handful of followers and I did not know about the science blogging community. I just knew that I wanted to share my journey with others. After a few months of blogging I received an email from Science Mentor and she told me how she liked my blog. This was exciting because I just started blogging. She told me she had a blog with resources for early career scientists and I knew I had to check it out. I’m glad I did!

I enjoyed talking to her about my journey and moving forward in the science writing/blogging community. We have some overlapping interests and it’s good to talk to someone who understands the science journey. She gave me some great advice and I know it will help my readers out too. Even though I’m new to blogging  and shy I’m going to work on putting myself out there because I want to help other STEM-ers. Thank you Donna for helping me and inspiring me to continue to share my journey through blogging.

Who is Science Mentor?: Continue reading

My Fall Reading List II


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This fall I wanted to share books that can appeal to a variety of readers. I hope you find something you like. If you have any book recommendations let me know in the comments section. I will be happy to add your recommendations to my winter reading list.

My Fall Reading List II: Continue reading

Resources for Scientists: Online Learning Using


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Last year I talked about using  as an Online Learning tool. I’m an advocate for learning more and taking advantage of resources, especially when they are free. After taking several courses I decided to explore other MOOC sites and I came across has a different look than and from my first glance at the site I can tell that wants the online learning experience to be user-friendly. Before you take a course on there is a free self-paced DemoX course that will help you get familiar with how works. Continue reading

Mademoiselle Spotlight Feature: The Thesis Whisperer/Dr. Inger Mewburn


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Toward the end of my undergraduate career I considered starting a blog, but I wasn’t sure. Then when I started graduate school I knew for sure I wanted to start blogging. As a graduate student I unofficially started blogging (generating ideas and topics) and discovered my first higher education blog, The Thesis Whisperer.

Dr Inger Mewburn The Thesis Whisperer

Photo Credit: TheThesisWhisperer 

Mademoiselle Spotlight: The Thesis Whisperer/Dr. Inger Mewburn:

Before officially starting Mademoiselle Scientist I reached out to The Thesis Whisperer and she emailed me back. She gave me some great feedback and tips to get started with my blog. The advice I remember the most is to just start blogging. There are not many blogs in the academic, science, women in STEM, and early research career category so there is a huge need. So I started blogging and here I am two years into blogging. I have a lot to learn and many things to share in my journey as a woman in science.

Looking back I’m glad I took The Thesis Whisperer’s advice because I really enjoy reading her blog. I highly recommend it! It’s a great resource for graduate students and professionals. I can’t believe I didn’t know about The Thesis Whisperer earlier in my academic career. It would have been handy. On the bright side I’m glad I found it!

What is The Thesis Whisperer? Continue reading

Back to School Tips for Undergraduate & Graduate Students (STEM Edition)


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It’s the most wonderful time of the year – Back to School Time! Good luck to everyone going back to school or starting a new school this year. I wish you the best. If you are an undergraduate or graduate student this post is for you.

My Back to School Tips: Continue reading

My 2nd Blogiversary: My STEM Journey – To be Continued…


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Since today is my 2nd Blogiversary I decided it was a perfect time to reflect on my journey as a woman in STEM and two years as a science blogger.

When I think about my journey as a woman in STEM I like to think about where I started. I always knew I wanted to become a scientist. I always knew I wanted to become a researcher. But the one thing I questioned was; how would I get there? I know we all have been there at one point of our STEM career.

There are many girls and young women that have this same question but some will never become scientists. Why? Because we didn’t give them the resources they needed to pursue their STEM degree and mentor them. If we don’t mentor them who will?

Mentoring is important at all levels. Mentors are real people who went through the ups and downs of a STEM career and made it. It’s not impossible without mentors but mentors can make a huge difference. There is a lot I can say about mentors and I will talk about that in a future post and I’m looking forward to sharing my mentoring series with you soon.

My mentors from an early age and the drive I had inside pushed me to become a scientist, researcher, and science writer/blogger. Through all the ups and downs I still wanted to pursue a STEM career. Why? Because I cannot imagine myself in another career. Science is something that comes natural to me and I like the challenge that comes along with it.

Further into my STEM journey I discovered my passion for science goes beyond research and writing. My passion extends to being an advocate for women in STEM and sharing resources to help others in their STEM career. As a Science blogger I have a platform that will grow and I’m excited to see what’s next for Mademoiselle Scientist! What do you want to see?

Moving forward I want to continue to share resources that will help fellow Mademoiselle Scientists. I want to learn more so that I can become a vaccine researcher. I will share my journey and help you with your journey.

Continue reading

My Summer Reading List II


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Now that summer is coming to an end and many people are back from vacation I decided this was a good time for me to share what I’ve been reading this summer. I had so many books in mind and it was hard to narrow down. If you checked out my spring reading list you will notice I picked a lot of books about careers and this summer I picked up some more.

My Summer Reading List II: Continue reading

The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat Reflection:


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Since many people are graduating I thought it would be a good time to share some PhD reflections from a #PioneerChat. A few months ago I participated in: The Real Talk about the PhD #PioneerChat hosted by Dr. Monica F. Cox with guest host, Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro. As a prospective PhD student I was looking forward to this twitter chat because I wanted to see what people who have been through the PhD process have to say. Plus it’s a great way to e-meet and network with fellow women in STEM.

To find out more about #PioneerChats, Dr. Monica Cox and Dr. Fatimah Williams Castro click here.

Just in case you missed the #PioneerChat click here to see it on storify.

Let’s get started!: Continue reading

#DearME STEM College Student Edition: What I Would Tell My Younger Self Part II


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A few months ago I was watching a beauty related video on YouTube and I came across this #DearME video. The #DearME Initiative is a global Initiative started by YouTube to celebrate International Women’s Day (March 8) to empower young girls everywhere. After watching a few #DearME videos I was inspired share my #DearME STEM College Student Edition. I believe it is important to reflect on the past to truly understand your journey. If you are a recent graduate or looking to update your myIDP tool write down the advice you would give your younger self. Think back to when you were a freshman in college. Here are the things I would tell my younger self – STEM College Student Edition:

#DearME: My Advice to My Younger Self – STEM College Student Edition:

1. It’s okay if you change your major: When you go to college you may have an idea about what major or career you want, but things can change. After taking a few courses you may want to explore different majors. Talk to your academic advisor and upperclassmen to see what other majors are out there. Remember your major doesn’t define you. Whether you want to become an engineer, scientist or work in public health there are many pathways to your career.

2. Don’t be afraid to be assertive: Ask questions, reach out to potential mentors and network. As a freshman this can be a bit scary, but give it a try. When you come out of your shell and start putting yourself out there people will notice. Plus you never know what opportunities you will find. If you are looking for some tips and tricks the book, Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office: 101 Unconscious Mistakes Women Make That Sabotage Their Careers by Lois Frankel is a good resource.

3. Explore the opportunities that STEM can take you early on: A STEM degree can take you anywhere. Sometimes thinking about different career paths can be a bit overwhelming as a STEM college student. Take time to talk to people and explore the opportunities at your university’s career center. Whether you want to study abroad, do research or get an internship seek opportunities. Even if you are a freshman you can start.

4. Remember your hard work will pay off: Being a STEM college student is a challenge, but all the obstacles you will face are worth it. Study-a-thons, hectic schedules and 4-hour chemistry labs may seem like a lot, but you will make it. Space out your course-load so that you can have a fun course in the mix of your STEM courses. The life of a STEM college student is about balance and you will learn it before you graduate. Remember success is great, but you don’t have to break yourself getting there. There will be ups and downs, but you will get through it.

5. Don’t be afraid to ask for help before it is too late: If you are having a difficult time in one of your STEM courses ask for help. Find a group of peers in your major. Groups like NSBE, SWE, SHPE and SOT are great places to start. Plus if you join these groups you can make new friends in your major and have a strong support system to help you through your college career.

6. Enjoy your college experience: Even though you may have a busy life as a STEM college student make sure you have fun. Go to social events, join groups or play sports. College is not only about getting your education, but it is also about having fun. When you graduate college you want to look back and say you were able to earn your degree and enjoy your college experience.

7. Don’t let negativity get you down: There will be people who believe that women or minorities in STEM cannot be successful. Don’t let their negativity get in your way of moving forward in your STEM career. Find a group of people who get you and can help you through your tough times.

To learn more check out part I of my advice to my younger STEM self.

What would you tell your younger self as a STEM College Student? #DearME

Share below.

My Spring Reading List II


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Now that spring is here its time to share my spring reading list. Since spring is a time to refresh yourself I decided to read books focusing on being successful. If you are feeling drained or unmotivated after this long winter, reading these types of books will help you get back on track. Here’s to getting motivated!

My Spring Reading List:

Continue reading


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