#ThankYourMentor – National Mentoring Month: My Science Mentoring Story

Happy New Year and Happy National Mentoring Month! Throughout the month we have seen posts, tweets and stories about the importance of mentoring. This is why The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR) and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health started National Mentoring Month back in 2002. National Mentoring Month focuses national attention on the need for mentors to ensure positive effect in young people. 1 in 3 young people will grow up without a mentor. Mentoring makes a difference, especially for underrepresented students who are interested in STEM fields. When students have science mentors it gives them the opportunity to learn about different science career options and build a positive support system.

Since today is the last event of National Mentoring Month (#ThankYourMentor day) and this is my first blog post of 2018 what better time to share how mentoring has made an impact on my science journey. I believe in the impact of mentors and encourage you to mentor someone new. In honor of #ThankYourMentor day I am going to share a few of my mentoring experiences.

As I mentioned in my Mentoring Series, mentoring at all stages is essential for students in the STEM fields, especially underrepresented minority students.  Continue reading #ThankYourMentor – National Mentoring Month: My Science Mentoring Story

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Black History Month Edition: My Experiences Participating in Research Training, Mentoring Programs & Science Organizations

In honor of Black History Month I was inspired to share my experiences participating in research training, mentoring programs and science organizations. I am grateful for all of my experiences and mentors that helped me become the woman in science that I am today. Coming from an inner city neighborhood and entering a big rural state university was like a dream. My main goal was to get a great education and learn as much as possible to prepare for a STEM career. Everything after that was an added bonus. I joined science organizations and reached out to science peers for support. For the first time I was able to see people in science that looked like me and I was determined to use the many resources that my university offered.

I participated in science programs such as the Women and Science and Engineering Orientation and the Minority Undergraduate Research Experience Program. These programs taught me the importance of leadership and strong mentoring.  I gained research experience, scientific knowledge and confidence that I could pursue a science career. This inspired me to use my science background not only to include research but include helping other scientists, especially underrepresented groups.

I encourage everyone to seek mentoring, the earlier the better. If you are looking for science mentors check out research training programs, mentoring programs and science organizations. There is a mentor for everyone. As a Gates Millennium Scholar (GMS) later I went on to become a mentor in the GMS program. Then when I entered graduate school I served on the Graduate Student Association to help first-year graduate students transition. I am passionate about helping the next generations of scientists. Science is challenging and fun, but rewarding. At times in the midst of progress I was faced with moments of negativity. There were people who told me that I did not belong and that I would not achieve my goals. I did not let their negativity stop me. I’m sure most of us have experienced negativity or felt alone in science at one point. Don’t let that stop you. Keep moving forward, pave the way and soon there will be others like you in your career. Continue reading Black History Month Edition: My Experiences Participating in Research Training, Mentoring Programs & Science Organizations

My Spring/Summer III Reading List:

Since summer is officially here and I haven’t shared my spring reading list I decided to combine my spring/summer list. I will update this list if I find a good book to share with you. If you have any books you want to recommend share them in the comments section.

My Spring/Summer Reading List: Continue reading My Spring/Summer III Reading List:

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope Podcast:

It’s been a long time since I have shared a Spotlight on Science or Mademoiselle Scientist post and I have to say I missed writing these posts. I haven’t listened to a science podcast in some time because I took a small break from podcasts. Not that long ago I was looking for a new science podcast and came across Beyond the (Micro)scope. Beyond the (Micro)scope is a podcast focusing on science, technology and business topics of women in science. I’m a huge advocate for women in STEM so this podcast was up my alley.

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope:

Beyond the (Micro)Scope was founded by Lindsay Claiborn and Dr. Mumu Xu. Claiborn is a multimedia journalist with a background in television reporting and digital producer at FOX Soccer. She is a Claremont McKenna College alum and has a Master’s in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University. Xu is an assistant professor in aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park and her research focuses on designing and controlling unmanned systems. She has a M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology and her B.S. from Harvard University.

It’s great seeing women coming together with a passion for STEM. I’m always looking for new science podcasts and/or blogs to check out to learn more about research news, science outreach and different STEM-ers doing great things. If you have any suggestions leave a link in the comments section.

What is Beyond the (Micro)Scope?:

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Photo Credit: Beyond the Microscope

Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientists: Beyond the (Micro)Scope Podcast:

Superwoman: Achieving Work-Life Balance

Even though I’m a young and healthy woman I have to remember I cannot do it all. I’m all for being a superwoman, but this superwoman needs a break. I’ve been reading a few blog posts here and there; talking to other women about this issue and realized that a superwoman needs to know her limits. In addition, a superwoman has to start saying “no”. When you say “no” that does not mean that you are being “rude”. A superwoman asserts herself and is confident. If you want to learn more about how you can be the best superwoman you can be in the workplace check out the book, Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office by Lois P. Frankel.

Besides this Lois P. Frankel’s book I recommend reading Dr. Amy Freeman’s book about work-life balance, Stress Less: 10 Balancing Insights on Work and Life. I did a Mademoiselle Spotlight on her last year and talked about how she is an inspiration to me as an Black Woman in STEM. She is a wonderful mentor and in her book I learned so many things about how I can achieve work-life balance. Continue reading Superwoman: Achieving Work-Life Balance

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Science Mentor/Donna Kridelbaugh

In my last Mademoiselle Spotlight I talked about The Thesis Whisperer and for this post I wanted to feature Donna Kridelbaugh/Science Mentor as this month’s Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist. Donna has amazing content for early career researchers and professionals. I’m happy to share information about Science Mentor because I enjoy finding resources for STEM-ers.

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Photo Credit: ScienceMentor

Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Donna Kridelbaugh:

When I started blogging I only had a handful of followers and I did not know about the science blogging community. I just knew that I wanted to share my journey with others. After a few months of blogging I received an email from Science Mentor and she told me how she liked my blog. This was exciting because I just started blogging. So I checked out her blog and it is indeed a gem of resources.

I enjoyed talking to her about my journey and moving forward in the science communication community. We have some overlapping interests and it’s good to talk to someone who understands the science journey. She gave me some great advice and I know it will help my readers out too. Even though I’m new to blogging and shy I’m going to work on putting myself out there because I want to help other STEM-ers. Thank you Donna for helping me and inspiring me to continue to share my journey through blogging.

Who is Science Mentor?: Continue reading Spotlight on Science/Mademoiselle Scientist: Science Mentor/Donna Kridelbaugh

My 2nd Blogiversary: My STEM Journey – To be Continued…

Since today is my 2nd Blogiversary I decided it was a perfect time to reflect on my journey as a woman in science and two years as a science blogger.

I always knew I wanted to become a scientist. I always knew I wanted to become a researcher. But the one thing I questioned was; how would I get there? I know we all have been there at one point of our STEM career.

There are many girls and young women that have this same question but some will never become scientists. Why? Because we didn’t give them the resources they needed to pursue their STEM degree and mentor them. If we don’t mentor them who will?

Mentoring is important at all levels. Mentors are people who went through the ups and downs of a STEM career and made it. It’s not impossible without mentors but mentors can make a huge difference. There is a lot I can say about mentors and I will talk about that in a future post and I’m looking forward to sharing my mentoring series with you soon.

My mentors from an early age and the drive I had inside pushed me to become a scientist, researcher, STEM advocate and science writer/blogger. Through all the ups and downs I still wanted to pursue a STEM career. Why? Because I cannot imagine myself in another career.

Further into my STEM journey I discovered my passion for STEM goes beyond research and writing. My passion extends to being an advocate for underrepresented groups, especially minorities and women in STEM. I want to share resources to help the next generations of scientists. As a science communicator I have a platform that will grow and I’m excited to see what’s next for Mademoiselle Scientist! What do you want to see?

Moving forward I want to continue to share resources that will help fellow Mademoiselle Scientists and the next generations of scientists. I will share my journey and help you with your journey.

Continue reading My 2nd Blogiversary: My STEM Journey – To be Continued…